Olive garden salad dressing

Olive garden salad dressing is about a piquant additive that complements without smothering the subtle flavours of your favourite greens. If you have no special salad then this dressing will make them simply unavoidable.

Because raw food, salads and fruit, nuts and seeds, cold pressed oils and juices are an essential part of the healthy diet; it's a subject close to the heart of most chiropractors.

To yours too, I hope, if you're making preparation for a vibrant old age with all your marbles intact.

Really, don't you too want to reach a healthy, happy eighty without a history of heart attacks, strokes and cancer? Eat more salad.

It was Helens 15 euro salad that rescued me from my misery; are you too all bunged up?

As you will have realised, this website is not about Cordon Bleu cooking, but about slow food, made fast, and that tastes simply out of this world. This dressing will take five minutes to throw together, and should keep for a week or two.

To be honest, I make it fresh daily. It's that easy. Certainly keep the bottle sealed, in the fridge, to reduce oxidation of the perishables like the lemon juice.

I hate prescribing exact details as fun cooking is about balancing the ingredients to suit the hopes and desires of your own taste buds. So add and subtract at will; feel free to experiment.

Bread experiments are wonderful too if you're into baking the daily loaf; it takes me less than five minutes, and that includes grinding the wheat. Whoever said preparing meals has to be a long and arduous, time consuming business? The secret is to keep it simple. Leave the Cordon bleu to the professionals.

Olive garden salad dressing

Olive garden salad dressing contains anti arthritic and heart friendly goodies.

  1. 500ml bottle of extra virgin olive oil, pour off about half a cup into your olive oil decanter. To the bottle, add
  2. A finely chopped clove or two of garlic
  3. Several finely chopped twigs of fresh sweet basil.
  4. A good slosh of Balsamic vinegar*.
  5. Half a lemon squeezed, include the pith if you like, and a little slither of the rind.
  6. Perhaps a whole chili. Some like it hot.
  7. Sea salt and freshly ground pepper.
  8. Refrigerate.

Here's an update; whilst I love balsamico, it always seems to be loaded with artificial chemicals that I avoid. I no longer use it.

In fact any dressing that you haven't made yourself must of necessity contain preservatives; it simply won't last for months even in the refrigerator. And then the manufacturers see the necessity to add flavour enhancers and other chemicals.

Worse, they are almost always made from one of the vegetable oils that are over endowed with omega 6 fatty acids; they cause inflammation in the body. It's much the best to make your own using olive oil.

Give the whole a good shake, and perhaps keep for a couple of days before using. You can add more garlic and basil if you like it stronger.

While there is no reason not to eat your olive garden salad recipe absolutely dry, I think a fine dressing will add much to your lunch, making it yet more palatable and delicious, and easier to chew and digest.

Many of the phytochemicals in your salad are better absorbed in the presence of fatty acids like you'll find in avocados and olives.

One beauty of a good salad is that you'll be less likely to suffer from indigestion heartburn even if you break the rules of gastronomic propriety. It's certainly also the cure for CONSTIPATION and all that goes with that nasty condition. Hemorrhoids, headaches, bowel cancer, and much much more.

Still having trouble?


Tapendade as you can see is in reality about olives and lemon juice. It's really just a lovely variation of an olive garden salad recipe; only the capers are different.

If you're looking for the healthy Mediterranean feel to add atmosphere for your guests then this tapenade is the perfect dip for your crackers, or tapas as they call it in Spain. A little aforethought is necessary, as you probably won't have capers in the pantry.

If you use pitted olives you can throw this delicious tapenade together in just five minutes. Literally. Pitting whole black olives, far better really, takes a little longer.

Together with a mixed greens and olive garden salad dressing, tapenade really makes a meal. Add a slice of our low GI or sourdough bread and you have the perfect lunch.

Butter is back remember so absolutely avoid the margarines that contain trans isomers; they are poisonous. If you enjoy salads like this on a daily basis you need have no fears of cholesterol.

Interestingly strong research shows that those who regularly enjoy eight different coloured foods have a 33 percent lower all cause of death. It improves your eyesight and so reduces car accidents and falls, makes your heart pump more strongly and cleans the atheromas from your blood vessels.

For the chiropractor they also reduce inflammation in your body; that's vital if you continually suffer from painful joints and muscles.

Another delicious way to enjoy sweet basil and olive oil is pesto, a piquant sauce that will liven up any dish.

For a short story about making this easy home recipe, click here; PESTO made in a jiffy with Santie and Janet, an excerpt from Bernard Preston's soap, A Family Affair.

Healthy living tips

There's no point of having a spine that's perfectly aligned with chiropractic, and you drop off the edge of the planet because you don't exercise, or eat garbage.

Our healthy living tips are for those who one day want to sit under the trees they once planted, sipping ice tea, whilst they watch the grandchildren grow up; a large part of the deal is your greens brightened with many colours, and they need an olive garden salad recipe.

Just add some of our healthy hummus recipe, and a few cubes of feta cheese for protein and you have the perfect lunch; and of course our olive garden salad dressing.

Ever thought of making your own easy sourdough bread recipe? It takes me five minutes every morning.

Chiropractic help

Even the very best of chiropractic help, or medicine for that matter, will not save you if your family eats rubbish. Consuming anti inflammatory foods like extra virgin olive oil on a daily basis is what protects not only your muscles and joints but the inner linings of your arteries and organs from becoming red and angry.

And to be honest the average salad, iceberg lettuce and few slithers of tomato, is deadly dull; that's what's dished up most often in the name of a salad. Add colour and our olive garden salad dressing for more tasty greens.

Better still, add a dollop of our homemade quick hummus.


» » Salad dressing

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Interesting challenges of the day

1. Mr S is a 76 year old man with neck pain of some 9 months duration. Luckily, most of the discomfort is upper cervical which is only rarely arthritic; his lower cervical spine is a degenerative mess that I've left alone. After seven treatments his pain and stiffness is 50 percent better, and he's happy in the circumstances. He can sleep through the night now and that makes a huge difference.

2. Mr P is 32 year old man with very severe lower back pain radiating to the big toe which is 30 percent numb. He had an episode three weeks ago, took anti inflammatories and was soon better as is typical of the medial disc herniation. But before it healed, after a trivia it came roaring back, much worse. The characteristic crossed sign was evident; sitting in a chair, straightening the right leg provoked severe left back pain and tingling in the leg. He's doing well.

3. Severe lower back pain is scary; just ask Mrs P. Just watching her get out of the car I she was in trouble; she had a slipped disc at L4 making her lean towards the opposite side; luckily she had no pain in the leg. Despite family pressure that this was far too severe for a chiropractor, she persevered. Within five days she was standing upright, and after two weeks almost painfree. 

Despite a hectic job, she wisely took my advice and stayed home for what I call exercising bed rest.

4. Mr S has had lower back, groin and back of thigh and calf pain for fourth months.

He has a pincer deformity in the hip causing the stabs in the groin, and a degenerative facet causing the sciatica. Both are responding well to chiropractic and he's well pleased; sixty five percent better after three treatments.

5. Mr T is a wise man; he's taken a warning TIA seriously and has lost 15 pounds, and has at least as much again to lose. A change to a low starch diet and half hour daily walk has made the difference; but the walking is making his foot and back miserable. The expensive orthotic is hopeless; luckily his hips and back are fine, but he needs a simple heel lift.

6. I too have had serious lower back issues, luckily fixed by my own chiropractor; so I too have to do my exercises, take care when lifting supers full of honey, gardening and using the chainsaw. Regaining the function of your spine is just as important as the pain.

7. My own granddaughter, only 7 is hypermobile giving her pelvic, knee and ankle issues. Xrays show a mildly dysplastic hip. Years ago we would have called it growing pains. She too regularly needs chiropractic care and luckily responds well. Increased range of motion is more difficult than too stiff in my opinion. Our care is for kids too.

8. This 65 year old lady is a serious gardener; every day she is bending, lifting and digging for 2 to 3 hours a day. It regularly catches her in the sacroiliac joint, so she has a treatment once a month that sorts it out. She does her lower back exercises faithfully.

9. This 88 year old lady is an inspiration; every day she is busy in the community. With a nasty scoliosis she manages very well with a chiropractic adjustment every six weeks and exercises faithfully done.  

10. Mr X is a 71 year old retired man who wants to continue with maintenance care every six to eight weeks; he had suffered from two years of lower back pain when he first came a year ago. He has no discomfort now after 8 chiropractic treatments, but is aware that danger lurks.

11. Mrs C has been having severe headaches, and taking a lot of analgesics. It's a non complicated upper cervical facet syndrome, and she's doing well.

12. Mr D is a 38 old year man with chronic shoulder pain after a rotator cuff tear playing cricket. It responded well to treatment, but he knows he must do his exercises every day; for two years he couldn't sleep on that shoulder.

13. Mr D, a 71 year old man, has a severe ache in the shoulder and midback since working above his head. Trapped nerve tests are negative but he has advanced degenerative joints of Luschka; after just two treatments he is 50 percent better. Can we reach 90?

And so the day goes; chiropractors shouldn't be treating the elderly most medical sites state but that's so much bunkum.

Have a problem that's not getting better? Looking for a different slant on your pain? Want to pose a question?

Interesting questions from visitors

CLS writes:

Greetings, Dr B.
You helped me quite some time back with a soothing and professional response which turned out to be exactly correct. I now consult a local chiropractor. You write a superb newsletter, too.

Your own unresolved problem. Pose a question

Knowing that up to 70% of the time the correct diagnosis is made with no examination, no special tests, no xrays, but just from the history, there's a fair chance I can add some insight to your unresolved problem. But at least 30% of the time, I may be quite wrong! Give plenty of detail if you want a sensible reply.

You visited this chiropractic help site no doubt because you have a problem that is not resolving and want to know more about what chiropractors do.

The quickest and most interesting way is to read one of my ebooks of anecdotes. Described by a reader as gems, both funny and healthful, from the life and work of a chiropractor, you'll love them. Priced right at $2.99, though Kindle fiddles the price without telling me.