Tremor in thumb and arm

Hi,

I would really appreciate an opinion please. I broke my right collarbone in 2 places April 2016 and had a plate inserted, which I had remove 2 weeks ago due to the discomfort I was having. A month after the initial injury I fell very heavily on my right shoulder which was extremely painful for a long time. The consultant suspected a rotator cuff injury but this couldn't be confirmed by an MRI scan due to the incompatibility of the plate.

Some time since then (can't pinpoint exactly when) I have developed a slight resting tremor in my right thumb and sometimes arm, and I thought this might go after the plate's removal. However, it has got worse which makes me think that there's a direct connection between the tremor, the injuries and surgery. Although I have recovered well from the operation and the associated pain, I still have a lot of discomfort in my shoulder, especially around the joint, and in the area to the left of it along the collarbone.

My question is therefore if you think the tremor is connected with the injuries and surgery and what the actual underlying cause might be?

Thank you.

If these tremors are what are known as fasciculations then they certainly could be related to the injury, or the surgery. They come from a denervated muscle.

Or it could be a side effect of the medication you are taking. I would advise an opinion from a neurologist; they would look for other signs and symptoms, such as wasting of muscles, weakness, numbness, changes in reflexes and run other tests.

Any force great enough to break a bone in two places almost certainly would have injured the joints at either end of the clavicle. The AC and SC joints. I would ask the orthopedist to refer you to either a physiotherapist or chiropractic for evaluation and treatment of these joints.

I hope this helps. Are you doing any shoulder exercises?

Dr B

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