Lower back and right groin pain. Trapped femoral nerve?

by Gill
(England)


Lower back and right groin pain. Trapped femoral nerve or hip condition, or both?

I have had several riding accidents over the years and seem to have been left with back and neck pain that comes and goes.

Over the last 3 months I have had severe, sudden onset pain in my right groin that makes me gasp out loud and stops me in my tracks. General stiffness and pain is worse after sitting and better when I am 'on the move'. Recently I have also had pain in my neck and outer thigh, sometimes going below my knee. I have had occasions when I can hardly put one foot in front of another and have been 'frozen' to the spot unable to bear weight on my right leg, but whilst riding my horse I have little or no pain.

I also have stiffness and swelling in my finger joints.
Where my back hurts there is a slight swelling on the spine.
Please advise what I should do. I am 62 and have always been active; mucking out, gardening and still work full time.
but now find I suffer if I am doing the above work; even getting out of the car can be difficult and I have to straighten up before I can walk.

All in all its a big nuisance and one I would like to get rid of!

Hello Gill,
The first question is whether this is primarily a hip condition, or a referred pain from your back or sacroiliac joint.

From what you describe, I favour a hip problem as weightbearing hurts, but riding your horse doesn't. How about swinging your right leg as you climb on to your horse?

We'll take this one step at at time. Firstly, lie on your back and pull your left knee to the chest, then towards the opposite shoulder and then make a circle, using your hip as the pivot.

Secondly, put your left foot on your right knee and drop the left knee into the Faber position.

Remember what you feel, and now repeat with the naughty hip. Is there a significant difference? If so, where is the stiffness and perhaps pain?

Let me know, keeping to this thread.

Dr B




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» Lower back and right groin pain. Trapped femoral nerve?

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Jan 25, 2016
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I have some ideas about your condition
by: Garry Anderson

Hi Gill: What you are describing is quite similar to the condition I have. I have some ideas about the cause and the remedy, however, I don't want to say anything that may be out of line with Dr. Barrie because he has helped me get to the bottom of my condition. Here is what I have found with my condition, so you may draw parallels to yours. My Psoas muscle has gone into contraction, compressing the lower spine joints L1-S1. The compression has caused a slight bulge in the discs at L4-5 and L5-S1, causing mild pinching of the nerve roots. The pinched nerves cause weakness in the leg and no power with the leg. Sitting for long periods makes the matter worse, keeping moving and walking makes it better. The pain in the groin is like a "stitch" that we used to get while running too much as a child. The pinched nerve keeps the Psoas muscle in contraction, not allowing the spine to recover, so I have a positive feedback loop that needs to be fixed with external manipulation. What I have found is working, and almost cured the condition, is three things: (1) I hang upside down on my inversion table for 5 minutes every morning and evening to stretch the Psoas muscle, (2) I walk about 30+ minutes each morning and evening, and (3) I get monthly chiropractic adjustments and weekly deep tissue massage treatments for the Psoas muscle combined with table extensions like the "cobra" pose in yoga. With this treatment, my leg is working again, and the groin pain is almost gone. There is a condition called "neural edema" which is swelling in the body resulting from nervous mis-function. For me, it started in the knee joints as soon as the Psoas went into contraction. Now, with the treatments, the swelling has gone away. In my case, I paid for an MRI to get a picture of the Lumbar Spine region so that the bulges could be seen and documented. The deep tissue massage therapist, that helped me recently, has returned to England, so she may be able to look at your condition. You can follow my postings at https://www.chiropractic-help.com/lateral-femoral-cutaneous-nerve-pinched-by-knotted-iliopsoas-muscle.html

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